Tag Archives: film

Buttercup Is Katniss Everdeen

Not literally, of course.   But to my mind, the lovely muddy yellow cat represents Katniss in a very real way.

katzenminze-06-and-buttercup

He’s mentioned on the very first page, standing guard over Prim as she sleeps. Not a plot point, not really light relief but he’s definitely subtext. In the third book, the subtext becomes overt, and it’s clear that Suzanne Collins planned it that way the whole time.

What Buttercup does right at the start of The Hunger Games is let us know right away that Katniss, our wonderful heroine, isn’t perfect, or romantic in any way. She tried to drown Buttercup, after all, because she didn’t want to have to feed him, only letting him live when Prim cries for his life. “Entrails. No hissing”; Katniss thinks that this is the high point of the relationship between Buttercup and her.

The first film is just as explicit at this stage: “I’ll still cook you”, is all Katniss says to Buttercup, as she walks past to go hunting. Buttercup is “the world’s ugliest cat”, and although the cat in HG1 isn’t the right colour, it’s not ugly, the poor thing. The first time I watched it, by the way, I had the sound quite low, and I thought she said, “I’ll kill you”. That works too, judging by their expressions.

Having watched the Special Features on the 2 disc version of The Hunger Games, I’m really puzzled that such an elementary mistake was made, in casting a cat of the wrong colour. I mean, the name is a clue as well. Most of the animals on the film were provided by Jungle Exotics, who don’t seem to have provided the cat, they list that they supplied birds, dogs and insects, but no cat. So it’s not their fault! They have a great website, and if they did tours round their 60 acre facility, I’d definitely sign up for one.

Anyway, back to Hunger Games. Of course, Katniss’ nickname is “Catnip” – which cats love. I don’t think Katniss knows how much she’s loved, and that comes out again and again in the rest of the book too. That informs everything she is, and everything she does: losing her father in the mine explosion when she was only 11, at which her mother slipped into a dark depression that lasted months, when Katniss and her little sister Prim almost died of starvation and Katniss herself was the one to figure out how to feed them. These things would leave their mark on any of us, and Suzanne Collins shows those emotional scars on Katniss very clearly. They match Buttercup’s looks, actually, all scarred and mashed.

And as Katniss falls asleep on the train that’s taking her towards The Hunger Games, Buttercup is almost the last thing she thinks of before she falls asleep: “scruffy old Buttercup”, watching over Prim, ready to nose into her arms to comfort her until she sleeps.

Prim is able to love openly: she loves Buttercup, and she loves her goat; but Katniss can’t love in the same way, not at the opening of the first novel. She loves Prim, and this is all we see for now of Buttercup and of Prim herself, because this has been the day of The Reaping, and Katniss has volunteered, to save 12 year old Prim.

The next time Buttercup turns up is at the very end, when Katniss first wakes up after being declared one of the winners of the 74th Hunger Games: “Home! Prim and my mother! Gale! Even the thought of Prim’s scruffy old cat makes me smile. Soon I will be home!”. It’s a poignant interlude, especially as we know that Katniss has so much more that she has to face.

Buttercup will stand by her.

 

 

Photo credit: thank you to Grey Geezer, who released Katzenminze-06 via Wikimedia for other web users.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Cats

c Nicole Hrustyk Dreamstime
Mrs Norris remembers                                         c Nicole Hrustyk Dreamstime

 

Cats are threaded through the whole of Harry Potter, it’s a wonderful thing to see – maybe that’s one of the reason I feel so at home in that universe? Although, in researching for this article, I discovered the not-so-secret secret that JK Rowling is allergic to cats, and doesn’t like to be in the same room with them for too long. She isn’t particularly fond of them, either.

However, she’s very fair: the first book tells us nearly everything about cats that JK Rowling wants us to know, and that is that cats are almost exactly the same as people. Some are good, some are bad, according to their own nature. The only difference between cats and people is that there’s no cat as evil as Voldemort, not that I can see, anyway, and that’s kind of JKR when she’s not fond of cats herself. Cats are integral to the wizarding world, just like they are to the muggle world.

The very first cat we see is Professor McGonagall, when she’s already Transfigured – Mr Dursley, on his way to work on the morning of that fateful day, sees a tabby cat reading a map. And she’s sitting on his garden wall when he comes home in the evening, but she waits for Professor Dumbledore, who doesn’t arrive till nearly midnight, and that’s Minerva McGonagall to a T – always active, and always supporting Dumbledore.

We only hear about the next cats, we don’t see them. These are the ones belonging to Arabella Figg, who used to babysit Harry during Dudley’s birthday trips out. But on those days, “Mrs Figg made him look at photographs of all the cats she’d ever owned … Tibbles, Snowy, Mr Paws and Tufty”. We soon find out that she’s gone off her cats a bit because she broke her leg tripping over one of the cats. Mrs Figg has her own secrets, of course, but we don’t even know that they exist until much later in the series.

Cats are one of the three sorts of animals allowed for first-years at Hogwarts: toads and owls are also on the list. So when Harry gets to platform nine-and-three-quarters for the first time and sees the wonderful engine building up steam for the journey to Hogwarts and the chattering crowd on the platform, “cats of every colour wound here and there between their legs”.

And that’s the point, really: they’re there, all the time in the background. Occasionally, one steps forward into the foreground and in this book, that’s really Mrs Norris, the cat of Mr Filch the caretaker. She has “bulging, lamp-like eyes just like Filch’s”, and quite like this Cat Pottery cat in a recent post of mine:

“She patrolled the corridors alone. Break a rule in front of her, put just one toe out of line, and she’d whisk off for Filch … it was the dearest ambition of many [students] to give Mrs Norris a good kick.”

 

Mrs Norris patrolled on her own!  Wizarding cats are more than our cats – more than our cats let us see, anyway … but Mrs Norris definitely isn’t likeable. Even Hagrid, when Harry and Ron go to tea with him for the first time, says “An’ as fer that cat, Mrs Norris, I’d like ter introduce her to Fang some time. D’yeh know, every time I go up ter the school, she follows me everywhere? Can’t get rid of her – Filch puts her up to it”.

No matter what – in the first film, Mrs Norris is a beautiful, beautiful slim long-haired Maine Coon – actually, three Maine Coons, according to the website Showcatsonline, which even shows behind the scenes training moments. I’ve not seen that anywhere else, and I really, really like Harry Potter.

Interestingly, there’s an interview on with Gary Gero on Scholastic, the wide-ranging learning website.  Gary is the animal trainer who provides many of the animals on the Harry Potter sets, and he has this to say about Mrs Norris (well, Tibbles): “we have to very carefully select cats. That’s one of the keys—you get a cat who enjoys work and enjoys the environment and enjoys new people and new situations. And then, it’s all about dinnertime with cats, isn’t it? We take their dinner and we divide it up into training sessions, and they’re pretty much working for their dinner. Then, they get a bowl of food at night as well. But they’re food is all regulated, and they’re fairly intelligent. Their training method is a little less direct than, let’s say, a dog. You make smaller steps. And again, once you understand exactly how a cat learns and what progress it makes, it’s not difficult. They try—you just have to be careful that you don’t expect too much of a single training session.”

Mrs Norris pops briefly into the story again when Harry and Ron visit the Mirror of Erised together at Christmas. They’re wearing the Cloak of Invisibility, but they can’t tell whether or not it works on cats. And JK Rowling doesn’t tell us at this stage!

She also pops in at the very start of the evening when Harry has his first confrontation with Voldemort, but it’s more a case of remembering that she’s there, and adding colour to the journey. It’s important to remember, though, that Mrs Norris looks at our heroic trio, even though they’re under the Invisibility Cloak. She doesn’t betray them, either.

And that’s it! For the first book, anyway. Though I should say, Gryffindor House has a lion as it’s symbol. Cats rule Hogwarts, just like they rule the Internet.